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The Palisade Wine Museum moves forward | Western Colorado


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Cedar Mill Group plans 22,000-person concert hall and wine museum for Pokolbin | The advertiser – Cessnock

The promoters of the Morisset Golf Course are planning a similar $ 40 million concert and hospitality venue “right in the heart” of the Hunter Valley wine region.

Its new Cedar Mill Group also acquired one of Australia’s leading Humm event and production companies – renamed Humm Events – as part of its efforts to streamline operations and embark on ambitious expansion plans.

The proposed site for the Cedar Mill Pokolbin site is at the corner of Broke Road and McDonalds Road, adjacent to the Hope Estate Cellar and Outdoor Music Room.

Cedar Mill Group Director Kyle McKendry described the land as “the most upscale development site in the Hunter Valley wine region.”

“It’s 105 acres of heavenly joy,” he said. “You already have Bimbadgen, Hope, and Roche, and we’re going to fall right in the middle. It’s at the heart of it all, but we’re up there doing our own thing.”

The development, plans for which will be filed with Cessnock City Council in the coming months, will likely include a wine museum or wine center of excellence.

The Cedar Mill Group architect visited “world-class tourism” sites in Europe and North America to sketch ideas for the site, McKendry said. Planning Cedar Mill Morisset, which includes an amphitheater with a capacity of 30,000, also briefed on the project.

“This will be the first purpose-built outdoor amphitheater in Australia, Morisset,” he said.

“We learned a lot, and now when we do the Hunter [site] we can overlay that. “

The Pokolbin and Morisset sites will ultimately be the first of “multiple sites” across Australia and New Zealand, he said.

Winarch Capital CEO Paul Lambess said the integration of Humm Events into the Cedar Mill Group was “a given”. Founded in 2001 by Iain Morrison, who will remain with the renowned company, Humm has managed a series of events including a recent U2 tour, the Good Things Festival and the Fire Fight Australia benefit concert.

“The challenge that we have set for ourselves as a company is to be the benchmark. We look forward to working with the passionate and experienced team at Humm Events and … to develop this exciting and already successful event activity”, Mr Lambess said.

This story Cedar Mill’s next stop at the Hunter Valley site
first appeared on Newcastle Herald.


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Cedar Mill Group plans 22,000-person concert hall and wine museum for Pokolbin | Newcastle Herald

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The promoters of the Morisset Golf Course are planning a similar $ 40 million concert and hospitality venue “right in the heart” of the Hunter Valley wine region. Winarch Capital, which filed plans almost two years ago for a $ 235 million mixed-use development on the former golf course, revealed it was making plans for a 22,000 concert hall. people in Pokolbin. Its new Cedar Mill Group has also acquired one of Australia’s leading Humm event and production companies – renamed Humm Events – as part of its efforts to streamline operations and embark on ambitious expansion plans. The proposed site for the Cedar Mill Pokolbin site is at the corner of Broke and McDonalds roads, adjacent to the Hope Estate cellar and outdoor music room. Cedar Mill Group Director Kyle McKendry described the land as “the most upscale development site in the Hunter Valley wine region.” “It’s 105 acres of heavenly joy,” he said. “You already have Bimbadgen, Hope, and Roche, and we’re going to fall right in the middle. It’s at the heart of it all, but we’re up there doing our own thing.” The development, plans for which will be filed with Cessnock City Council in the coming months, will likely include a wine museum or wine center of excellence. The Cedar Mill Group architect has visited “world-class tourism” sites in Europe and North America to derive ideas for the site, McKendry said. Planning Cedar Mill Morisset, which includes an amphitheater with a capacity of 30,000, also briefed the project. “This will be the first purpose-built outdoor amphitheater in Australia, Morisset,” he said. “We learned a lot, and now when we do the Hunter [site] we can overlay that. ”Mr. McKendry said he expected Morisset’s final development application to be approved before the end of the year and work to begin on the site at the start of the year. The Pokolbin and Morisset sites will ultimately be the first of “many” across Australia and New Zealand, he said. Winarch Capital CEO Paul Lambess said the integration of Humm Events into the Cedar Mill Group was “a given”. Founded in 2001 by Iain Morrison, who will remain with the renowned company, Humm has managed an array of events, including a recent U2 tour, the Good Things Festival and the Fire Fight Australia benefit concert. “The challenge that we have set for ourselves as a company is to be the benchmark. We look forward to working with the passionate and experienced team at Humm Events and developing this exciting and already successful event business, ”said Mr. Lambess. the community. Here’s how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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The new wine museum that transforms the historic warehouse district of Porto

The first one came The City of Bordeaux Wine in 2016: a 10-storey wine temple on the banks of the Garonne. This year, Portugal did better; why have a city when you can have the world? After five years of development, and at a cost of € 105m (£ 95m), World of Wine (WoW) open in July in Porto, housed in 55,000 m² of restored Port wine cellars. It is one of the biggest tourism projects launched in Europe this year: six immersive museum experiences, five restaurants, plus bars, cafes, event and exhibition spaces, boutiques and, to top it off, a wine school offering one and several one-day courses focusing on Portuguese viticulture and gastronomy. There are also virtual tours of Portuguese wine production through the ages and a comprehensive guide to cork, another of the country’s main exports.

Located in Vila Nova de Gaia, the hub of the European wine industry since the 1700s, WoW revolves around a central open-air plaza with views of Porto’s terracotta rooftops and the Douro River. And, as in Bordeaux, this ambitious new opening hopes to offer the city a fresh new cultural district, and the company identifies itself in this way (the “New Cultural Quarter” of Porto). Scheduled to join WoW later this year is the Porto Fashion and Fabric Museum, housed in an 18ecentury building which includes a chapel designed by the famous Italian artist and architect Nicolau Nasoni, with restored frescoes.

Did you know? According to the World Factbook, Portugal was the world’s ninth largest exporter of wine in 2019, shipping for $ 920 million (£ 706.5 million). The UK was 10th, with exports totaling $ 837 million (£ 642.8 million).


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The Bordeaux Wine Museum announces its expansion in Beijing

Bordeaux Wine Museum Cité du Vin is teaming up with the city of Beijing to build a 194,000 square foot wine museum in China. The new museum, inspired by the Cité du Vin, will be located 40 kilometers southwest of the city center of the Chinese capital and is expected to open in 2021. The planned construction cost is $ 66.5 million.

“Wine is part of our world heritage,” said Sylvie Cazes, president of the Foundation for Wine Cultures and Civilizations, which manages the Bordeaux museum. “Our mission is to share this great story with Chinese visitors.”

The contemporary design of the new museum echoes a Cubist interpretation of the Saint-Emilion skyline and will be located in the heart of Zhong Pu Hui wine village, a development in Beijing’s Fangshan district. This region is already rich in culture, home to Shidu Natural Park, Yunju Temple and the site where the “Peking Man” homo erectus fossils have been discovered.

Weixang Tang, 62, a Chinese businessman who made his fortune through duty-free shopping on board, led the effort to build the museum. President and founder of Zhong Pu Hui wine village, Tang was awarded the Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur in 2015 for his long-standing commitment to French culture. “China and France share a special affection for gastronomy and the friendliness that goes with it,” Tang said. He believes that the cultural and gastronomic richness of wine attracts Chinese consumers looking for new experiences and knowledge.

The village currently includes several hectares of vines. Tang has a building permit for 3 square miles of development, including two hotels, lodges, a farm, restaurants, bars and shops, as well as a free trade zone for Chinese and foreign companies engaged in the wine, organic farming and, more generally, energy transition. There will also be a startup hub for entrepreneurs.

Tang started the museum project, but the Chinese government supported the project and is now the sole funder. The 72,000 square foot permanent exhibit, an immersive experience, will build on what the team learned in Bordeaux, but with additions specifically designed for Chinese visitors. Guests can visit five areas: What is wine ?, Wine in the world, History and civilization of wine, Wine and the senses and Lifestyle and wine, which includes information on how to buy and drink wine, all complemented by a quiz and tasting. .

“I think this project is great because it was promoted by someone with whom we have a great relationship and who has a real dual culture. He has one foot in China and one foot in Paris,” said Cazes.


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Tang’s ties to French culture go back to his childhood during the Cultural Revolution. Her family was separated and banished to the countryside for work. Tang’s mother wanted him to study and found a French teacher. Years later, he spent a year studying French at the Sorbonne in Paris.

Tang’s appreciation for French wine inspired him two decades ago to plant the first vineyard in Fangshan. Today, Château Bolongbao, with 173 hectares of vines at the foot of the Wulanshan mountains, produces 11,700 cases per year, mainly Cabernet Sauvignon-Merlot blends. Since Tang’s pioneering investment, more than 30 neighboring vineyards have grown. And the area is connected to downtown Beijing by metro, train, and highways, an easy commute for tourists and entrepreneurs.

“We are at the start of a very long history. In my opinion, wine in China will be very important,” said Jean-Marc Menant, general manager of the wine village.


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Wine Museum / Workshop 405

Wine Museum / Workshop 405

© Fernando Guerra |  FG + SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG + SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG + SG© Luis Coelho+ 53

© Fernando Guerra |  FG + SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG + SG

Text description provided by the architects. The Douro territory in northern Portugal has the oldest demarcated wine regions in the world. The city of São João da Pesqueira is historically the center of this region and, in order to preserve the traditions of ancient knowledge that range from wine production to the techniques and traditions of the workers, decided to build a wine museum.

© Fernando Guerra |  FG + SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG + SG
Section 2
Section 2
© Fernando Guerra |  FG + SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG + SG

Located near the city center, the museum is presented as a semi-underground building, behind a 19th century wine press building. Restored and included in the museum’s main exhibition, the press is an independent construction capable of producing wine in an archaic way. Also has a temporary exhibition gallery. The main building is distributed by a vertical arrangement of six floors. The exhibition spaces are developed between tunnels and galleries where the contrast between light and shadow is explored in different visual relationships provided by the gaps between floors.

© Fernando Guerra |  FG + SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG + SG

The whole space is unified by the sunlight filtered through a concave glass steel structure covered in brown zinc, and by the contrast between the textured wood and the raw concrete walls. The building materials and construction methods are simple traditional walls and woodworking, reflecting the austerity of the region.

© Fernando Guerra |  FG + SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG + SG



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Boisset opens a “tribute to Napa Valley” wine museum, a tasting room in a 145-year-old building

The Boisset Collection in Napa opened “a tribute to Napa Valley”, called 1881 Napa, in Oakville. It is said to be the first wine history museum and tasting room in the valley.

The Victorian home features a tasting room that showcases wines from distinct Napa Valley sub-appellations, a museum where guests can explore Napa’s rich wine history, an extensive collection of historic wine relics from Europe and the United States. United and original artefacts from the first California wine. Commercial archives.

The lounge-museum is located next to Oakville Grocery, which began in 1881 and is the oldest operating of its type in California. The grocery store and the house were bought by Boisset Collection at the start of the year.

“The Napa Valley holds an important place in the history of American wine and 1881 Napa puts the region in perspective on the world stage,” said owner Jean-Charles Boisset, who grew up in Burgundy, France. “An extraordinary amount has been accomplished in this enclave in a short period of time and we want to create a destination that celebrates the long history of Napa and its pioneering founders while exploring the incredibly diverse land of Napa in one destination.”

The living room is housed in a building over 140 years old and reimagined by architect Howard Backen. The two centerpieces of the space – a 48-light Baccarat crystal Zenith chandelier and a reproduction of an 1895 map of Napa County on a canvas suspended from the ceiling.

1881 Napa is located at 7856 St. Helena Highway and is open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reservations are recommended.


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A wine museum bridges the two Bordeaux worlds | The independent

Bordeaux, the region, is historically unrivaled as the largest and most prodigious producer of fine wines in the world.

Bordeaux, the port city on the Garonne, has played a crucial role as a center of the wine trade. Historically, however, it has lacked charm and love, and paradoxically, beyond its commercial ties, Bordeaux has had little connection with the wine producers of the wine regions that define the region and practically surround the city.

The entire tour can take around two hours, by which time you’re ready for the glass of wine included with admission

(Reuters)

But an ambitious wine museum that opened in the city of Bordeaux on the west bank of the river in 2016 is working to change that. While capturing global wine culture in a modern, immersive and multimedia style, La Cité du Vin hopes to serve as a vital link between the urban center of the wine trade and the myriad of producers who have historically distinguished themselves.

Simply a cultural center, the Cité du Vin is brilliantly successful in many ways. As a symbol, the curvaceous, contemporary building designed by XTU, a Parisian architectural firm, swirls from the riverside, much like the Guggenheim Museum flowing uphill on Fifth Avenue. By way of declaration, it is said that conservative and narrow-minded Bordeaux is no more.

The museum examines the extent of wine culture around the world

(Reuters)

Located between the Chartrons districts, the historic center of the wine trade, and Bacalan, a wharf and a manufacturing area, La Cité anchors a growing tourist hub, which includes a huge German concrete bunker that once housed sub- sailors during the Nazi occupation and is now transformed into an underground art center.

The few wine museums I have visited around the world have never really caught the imagination. The more ambitious the museum, the more transparent its promotion for a particular region, a certain producer or the benefits of wine. The most successful were the local ones, which simply featured artifacts without forced narratives.

But La Cité consciously avoids outright promotion and celebration of Bordeaux. Instead, it takes an ecumenical approach, examining the breadth of wine culture around the world and letting history – and the people who make the wines – speak largely for itself.

“The challenge was to say to ourselves: ‘We are not promoting wine, we are promoting the culture of wine’”, explains Sylvie Cazes, who has helped advance the Cité du Vin project at the both as a member of the City of Bordeaux from 2008 to 2014, and as a member of an important Bordeaux wine family which owns, among other properties, Château Lynch-Bages.

A buffet table offers the possibility of “indulging in the sensory experience of wine tasting”

(Reuters)

Vinexpo Bordeaux, a large trade fair for wine held every two years, was a particular inspiration, she said.

“Vinexpo works because all the wines of the world are participating,” said Cazes. “It made it a success. “

La Cité has 10 levels, including a wine bar, boutique, exhibition spaces, special tasting areas, a theater (named after Thomas Jefferson) and, on the top floor, a panoramic restaurant with a magnificent view of the city.

But at its heart is a permanent exhibition of 19 thematic spaces that offer insight into the vineyards of the world, the development of the domesticated vineyard, the intricacies of wine making, the nuances of tasting and drinking, and presentations. history on transporting wine and enjoying it dating back to 6000BC.

Ultimately, this begs the existential question of why humans have gone to such extreme efforts to create a drink that is not essential to existence.

La Cité consciously avoids outright promotion and celebration of Bordeaux

(Reuters)

Upon arrival, visitors are given a “travel companion,” individual, cell-phone-sized electronic guides that connect directly to each stop on the tour, explaining in eight languages ​​exactly what you’re watching and how to interact with it. From there, you are on your own, free to wander among the exhibits at your own pace, in your own way.

You can start with a dizzying virtual helicopter tour of the world’s vineyards, a global glimpse that spans the globe in about 15 minutes on three large, curved screens. Or you could watch winemakers discussing their vineyards, from the famous, like Dominique Lafon in Meursault Perrières, one of the great springs of white Burgundy, to a monseigneur at the wine cellar of the Alaverdi monastery in the country of Georgia, one of the cradles of the wine civilization. , where techniques have changed little over the centuries.

The videos are so crisp that at one point I found out that I couldn’t pay attention to winemaker Wilhelm Haag from Fritz Haag, a good riesling producer in the Moselle region of Germany, because the web of background – Juffer Sonnenuhr’s incredibly craggy vineyard – distracted me with C’est la beauté.

Exhibits explain how vines and grapes were domesticated, how they occupied exalted mythological positions within ancient societies, and how vines adapt to very different terrains.

Atmospheric enhancements creep in almost unconsciously when you examine the exhibit: birdsong, thunder, helicopter noise. Later, discovering the use of barrels and the evolution of wine in them over time, I suddenly realized that I smelled of oak, used in the construction of the display.

Not all exhibits are so downright historical. A buffet table offers the opportunity to ‘indulge in the sensory experience of wine tasting’, offering surprisingly effective examples of different aromas and textures, and the ability to test your nose if desired.

I especially enjoyed a lively presentation of how wine merchants through the ages have challenged themselves over the millennia to transport wine overseas to customers who wanted it. This is not strictly realistic, as one character berates a god: “You are all the same. You have eternity but no patience.

The entire tour can take around two hours, after which you are ready for the glass of wine included with entry.

The permanent exhibition is aimed at all those who wish to know more about wine. La Cité also offers two temporary exhibitions per year, in connection with other wine regions, which explore specific subjects such as wine and art, or wine and music.

La Cité has 10 levels, including special tasting areas

(Reuters)

In its first year, Cazes said, 445,000 visitors came to the museum, which far exceeded initial forecasts.

A particularly encouraging sign for La Cité is that the city of Bordeaux is now attracting more visitors. Once drab and dirty, with few places of interest to visit or eat, Bordeaux has undergone a transformation in the past 15 years.

The facades of its 18th and 19th century architecture, once gray with grime, shine today. An extensive new tram system provides an easy-to-use public transport network, and the narrow streets of the Old Town are filled with busy restaurants and wine bars. In truth, many wine bars are so trendy that it’s much easier to find natural wines than it is to get a bottle of good old Bordeaux.

As to whether La Cité can help bridge the gap between the city and its surrounding wine industry, tourism will play a central role in its success. The museum will serve as a starting point for visits to the Médoc, the historic district encompassing the famous districts of Margaux, St-Julien and Pauillac. Some will go by bus. Others will leave by boat from La Cité, up the Garonne to the Gironde estuary.

Tourism has not historically been encouraged in Bordeaux areas, Cazes said. Cellars were not equipped for tours and, she said, Bordeaux traders feared visitors would buy wine directly from producers rather than through their networks.

Indeed, the Bordeaux tourist office has an office within La Cité, she said, and is eager to sell tickets for tours.

© New York Times


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Burgundy plans to open a wine museum by 2020

The Burgundy Wines Office has approved a project to build a network of wine tourism centers in the region, called “Cités des Vins de Bourgogne”.

Approved Burgundy wine museums

There will be three sites for the Cities of Burgundy Wines: one in Beaune, one in Mâcon; and one in Chablis. They should be ready by 2020.

The Burgundy Wines Bureau (BIVB) approved the plan at 72% in December 2016.

It follows the opening of Bordeaux’s € 80 million wine theme park, Cité du Vin, in June 2016, and shows how tourism is becoming more important for French wine regions.

The Burgundian authorities want to “encourage tourists to venture further than the Dijon-Beaune axis, and to explore the wine region in the broad sense, to stay longer and to come back”, the BIVB noted.

It also aims to educate about terroirs, the climates, grape varieties and oenological practices of Burgundy, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015.

Guests will also be able to taste wines and purchase wine selection boxes at each of the new centers.

While the Bordeaux City of Wine has information on the wines of the world – and has at least 70 Burgundy wines to taste – the Cités des Vins de Bourgogne project is specific to Burgundy.

The Beaune site – which will be the largest of the three – will be part of a redevelopment of the district that includes a new five-star hotel, a large reception hall, a shopping center and two restaurants. It will also house the Burgundy Wine School.

‘[This is] a project that will affect an entire generation, ”said Louis-Fabrice Latour, President of the BIVB.

More from Burgundy:

Test your skills with the kick-off of Bourgogne 2015 en primeur …

Discover the real France of farmers’ markets, Burgundian cuisine, country guest houses and small producers who are passionate about their vineyards, says Sue

There is still value to be had if you know where to look …


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The new Bordeaux wine museum opens its doors | Smart News

After seven years of development, design and construction, a magnificent museum dedicated to wine is now open in the Bordeaux region of France. The wines of the region have been known for centuries, but the brand new The City of Wine (City of Wine) is aptly named.

The bizarre architecture of La Cité du Vin certainly stands out among the other buildings along the Garonne de Bordeaux. The 10-story building looks more like a twisting mirrored vine than a classic museum, an effect absolutely desired by its designers, Anouk Legendre and Nicolas Desmazières. The duo designed the monument of French wine culture to mimic both the swirl of wine in a glass, the sinuous curves of the vineyard and the waves of the nearby river, Nick Rose reports for Snacks.

“This building does not look like any recognizable shape because it is an evocation of the soul of wine between the river and the city”, recount Legendre and Desmazières. ArchDaily.

La Cité du Vin may be a museum dedicated to wine, but the wealth of activities inside has led some to compare it to a World’s Fair. Inside the museum is a two-story wine bar, a 250-seat auditorium for classes and film screenings, as well as 20 exhibits on the process, culture and history of winemaking, Mike MacEacheran reports for Condé Nast Traveler. Some have even called it a wine-themed amusement park, highlighting the museum’s virtual boat ride simulating a merchant ship’s travels around the world and a “taste experience” that includes moving sets and displays. 3D displays as well as manufactured scents that accompany the exhibits.

“I said that ‘La Cité du Vin will be my Guggenheim'”, Alain Juppé, former French Prime Minister, mayor of Bordeaux and founder of the museum said in a press release. “It was paradoxical that Bordeaux, with its very special position among the world’s wine regions, did not have an emblematic place paying homage to one of the key elements that has made it so rich for centuries.

The museum was not cheap: the unique building and its lavish exhibits cost around $ 91 million. Officials, however, believe the museum will be profitable and expect it to attract 450,000 visitors a year and bring in millions of dollars to the local economy, Rose reports.

“We want young people, old people, wine connoisseurs and people who just want to enjoy the building and the view”, Philippe Massol, CEO of the museum, says Roger Voss for Wine lover. “We will judge our success if they drink a glass of wine with more understanding and respect than before.”

La Cité du Vin officially opened on Wednesday and tickets cost € 20 each ($ 22.37). Events such as guided wine tastings, workshops and wine tours will begin later this summer.


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